About the Migration Governance Indicators
About the Migration Governance Indicators
Migrants' rights
Migrants' rights

Indicators in this domain assess the extent to which migrants have the same status as citizens in terms of access to basic social services such as health, education, and social security. It also describes the rights of migrants to family reunification, to work, and to residency and citizenship. The ratification of the main international conventions is also included within this domain.

Whole of government approach
Whole of government approach

Indicators in this domain assess countries’ institutional, legal, and regulatory frameworks related to migration policies. Domain 2 also reviews the existence of national migration strategies that are in-line with development, as well as institutional transparency and coherence in relation to migration management. This domain also investigates the extent to which governments collect and use migration data.

Partnerships
Partnerships

This domain focuses on countries’ efforts to cooperate on migration-related issues with other states and with relevant non-governmental actors, including civil society organizations and the private sector. Cooperation can lead to improvements in governance by aligning and raising standards, increasing dialogue and providing structures to overcome challenges.

Well-being of migrants
Well-being of migrants

This domain includes indicators on countries’ policies for managing the socioeconomic well-being of migrants, through aspects such as the recognition of migrants’ educational and professional qualifications, provisions regulating student migration and the existence of bilateral labour agreements between countries. Indicators equally focus on policies and strategies related to diaspora engagement and migrant remittances.

Mobility dimensions of crises
Mobility dimensions of crises

This domain studies the type and level of preparedness of countries when they are faced with mobility dimensions of crises, linked to either disasters, the environment and/or conflict. The questions are used to identify the processes in place for nationals and non-nationals both during and after disasters, including whether humanitarian assistance is equally available to migrants as it is to citizens.

Safe, orderly and regular migration
Safe, orderly and regular migration

This domain analyses countries’ approach to migration management in terms of border control and enforcement policies, admission criteria for migrants, preparedness and resilience in the case of significant and unexpected migration flows, as well as the fight against trafficking in human beings and smuggling of migrants. It also assesses efforts and incentives to help integrate returning citizens.

Key findings
INTRODUCTION

This country profile describes examples of well-developed areas of the Republic of Honduras’s (hereafter referred to as Honduras) migration governance structures and areas with potential for further development, as evaluated by the six domains of the Migration Governance Indicators (MGI). These address migrants’ rights, a “whole-of-government” approach, partnerships, socioeconomic well-being of migrants, the mobility dimensions of crises, and safe and orderly migration. 

Click the icons on the wheel to explore the key findings.

The Migration Governance Indicators (MGI) initiative is a policy-benchmarking programme led by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and implemented with the support of the Economist Intelligence Unit. Funding is provided by the Government of Sweden.

Key findings
1. MIGRANTS' RIGHTS

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

  • The Basic Law on Education of 2012 guarantees access to education up to the secondary level for all young people in the country.
  • Honduras is a party to the Ibero-American Multilateral Agreement on Social Security (CMISS), which allows retirees in the Latin American region to access the benefits associated with all the contributions they have paid throughout their working life, regardless of whether those payments were made in different member countries of that Agreement.
  • There are paths to naturalization for migrants in Honduras.

Areas with potential for further development:

  • Relatives declared as economic dependents of migrants residing in Honduras may not immediately obtain a work permit.
  • Employers have a cap on the number of immigrants they may hire.
Key findings
2. WHOLE OF GOVERNMENT APPROACH

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

  • Honduras has legislation that regulates immigration and emigration.
  • Information on the Honduran legal framework for migration is easily obtainable, as it is available on a number of websites.
  • There is transparency regarding statistics on returnees.
  • The National Institute of Statistics gathers migration-related data by means of the national census.

Areas with potential for further development:

  • There is no lead institution with overall responsibility for monitoring and overseeing migration policy. The responsibility is incumbent on several government departments.
  • Except for those conducted in 2009 and 2011, the Multi-Purpose Household Surveys do not have a migration information module.
Key findings
3. PARTNERSHIPS

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

  • In October 2016, Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras signed a Memorandum of Understanding on labour cooperation, thereby laying the groundwork for formulating a joint plan of support for migrant workers.
  • Honduras has bilateral agreements regarding sharing migration-related information with Colombia and Ecuador. Additionally, Honduras takes part in regional consultative processes on migration, such as the Regional Conference on Migration (RCM).
  • The Government works with various stakeholders on economic issues in order to formulate comprehensive migration-related strategies.

Areas with potential for further development:

  • There are no programmes for preserving ties with Hondurans abroad who have the wherewithal to contribute to the country’s development.
  • Honduras has not ratified the ILO Migration for Employment Convention (Revised), 1949 (No. 97) or the Migrant Workers (Supplementary Provisions) Convention (No. 143) of 1975.
Key findings
4. WELL-BEING OF MIGRANTS

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

  • Honduras has mechanisms for protecting the rights of the Honduras population abroad.
  • The Honduran Government maintains relations with the governments of other countries so as to boost opportunities for Honduran workers and safeguard their rights.

Areas with potential for further development:

  • There are no formal mechanisms for closely monitoring the job market implications of migration.
  • There are no programmes to facilitate the granting of residence permits to attract workers and professionals with specific sill sets.
  • Immigrants are permitted to study in Honduras upon application for a special permit of residence for students, but there is no legal framework that facilitates or promotes their integration into the local job market at the end of their studies.
Key findings
5. MOBILITY DIMENSIONS OF CRISES

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

  • The Permanent Contingency Commission (COPECO) is responsible for disaster risk management.
  • The Ministry of Natural Resources and the Environment (SERNA) is responsible for the National Climate Change Strategy.
  • Honduras has measures that allow for exceptions to immigration procedures for migrants whose country of origin is undergoing a crisis.
  • The country’s development plan – Vision for the Country 2010-2038 and National Plan 2010-2020 (Visión de País 2010-2038 y Plan de Nación 2010-2022) – addresses migration issues and delineates programmes for the reintegration of returning migrants.

Areas with potential for further development:

  • Risk management and contingency plans still do not include a specific strategy whereby particular services are provided in crisis situations to vulnerable migrants.
  • There is still room for improving the infrastructure and facilities for assisting and protecting migrants in transit originating from countries in crisis.
Key findings
6. SAFE, ORDERLY AND REGULAR MIGRATION

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

  • Honduras has reception centres for returning migrants.
  • There are clearly defined lines of responsibility for implementing migration policy at the border.

Areas with potential for further development:

  • Although the Interinstitutional Commission to combat Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Human Trafficking (CICESCT) publishes information on human trafficking, these statistics are not published regularly.
  • There is no electronic platform to apply for residency before arriving in Honduras.

2018 May

Migration Governance Profile: Republic of Honduras