About the Migration Governance Indicators
About the Migration Governance Indicators
Migrants' rights
Migrants' rights

Indicators in this domain assess the extent to which migrants have the same status as citizens in terms of access to basic social services such as health, education, and social security. It also describes the rights of migrants to family reunification, to work, and to residency and citizenship. The ratification of the main international conventions is also included within this domain.

Whole of government approach
Whole of government approach

Indicators in this domain assess countries’ institutional, legal, and regulatory frameworks related to migration policies. Domain 2 also reviews the existence of national migration strategies that are in-line with development, as well as institutional transparency and coherence in relation to migration management. This domain also investigates the extent to which governments collect and use migration data.

Partnerships
Partnerships

This domain focuses on countries’ efforts to cooperate on migration-related issues with other states and with relevant non-governmental actors, including civil society organizations and the private sector. Cooperation can lead to improvements in governance by aligning and raising standards, increasing dialogue and providing structures to overcome challenges.

Well-being of migrants
Well-being of migrants

This domain includes indicators on countries’ policies for managing the socioeconomic well-being of migrants, through aspects such as the recognition of migrants’ educational and professional qualifications, provisions regulating student migration and the existence of bilateral labour agreements between countries. Indicators equally focus on policies and strategies related to diaspora engagement and migrant remittances.

Mobility dimensions of crises
Mobility dimensions of crises

This domain studies the type and level of preparedness of countries when they are faced with mobility dimensions of crises, linked to either disasters, the environment and/or conflict. The questions are used to identify the processes in place for nationals and non-nationals both during and after disasters, including whether humanitarian assistance is equally available to migrants as it is to citizens.

Safe, orderly and regular migration
Safe, orderly and regular migration

This domain analyses countries’ approach to migration management in terms of border control and enforcement policies, admission criteria for migrants, preparedness and resilience in the case of significant and unexpected migration flows, as well as the fight against trafficking in human beings and smuggling of migrants. It also assesses efforts and incentives to help integrate returning citizens.

Key findings
Introduction

This profile describes examples of well-developed areas of the City of Montréal's migration governance structures and areas with potential for further development, as evaluated by the six domains of the Migration Governance Indicators (MGI). These address migrants’ rights, a “whole-of-government” approach, partnerships, socioeconomic well-being of migrants, the mobility dimensions of crises, and safe and orderly migration. 

Click the icons on the wheel to explore the key findings.

The Migration Governance Indicators (MGI) initiative is a policy-benchmarking programme led by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and implemented with the support of the Economist Intelligence Unit.  

Key findings
Migrants' rights

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

•   The Service for Diversity and Social Inclusion of  Montréal promotes the integration of newcomers by ensuring the protection of their rights.

•   The Montréal Newcomer Office informs newcomers on how to find housing.

•   Montréal provides financial support to several community organizations coming to the aid of immigrants and offering legal advice. 

Areas with potential for further development:

•   The city does not have a public awareness-raising campaign specifically aimed at fighting hate crimes, violence, and xenophobia.

Key findings
Whole of Government Approach

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

•.  The Montréal Inclusive action plan proposes solutions to challenges such as economic and occupational integration and support for persons whose immigration status is precarious.

•   In 2019, the city launched “Écho, le baromètre de l’intégration”, a major survey of newcomers to ensure that the city’s services are accessible to them and that their concerns are addressed.   

•   Montréal is piloting the development of a “station nouveau départ”, a one-stop shop where newcomers can access all services provided by the municipal, provincial and federal governments. 

Areas with potential for further development: 

•   The information on programmes for newcomers on the website of the city of Montréal is available in French and English only.

Key findings
Partnerships

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

•.  Montréal frequently cooperates with the “Table de concertation des organismes au service des personnes réfugiées et immigrantes”, a group of organizations working with refugees, immigrants and those with no regular status. 

•   The Montréal Newcomer Office helps newcomers acquire a first job experience in Montréal businesses through the Inclusive Workplace Strategy.

•   The city has cooperation agreements with the Ministry of Immigration, Diversity and Inclusion for the integration and inclusion of immigrants, and the Ministry of Employment and Social Solidarity on fighting poverty. 

Areas with potential for further development: 

•.  There is no mechanism for sharing migration data between the different levels of government and with the various local partners.

Key findings
Well-being of migrants

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

•   Montréal  attracts and supports entrepreneurs from the immigrant community under its entrepreneurship action plan – Entreprendre Montréal.

•.  Montreal’s economic development service works together with local universities to attract and retain students and foreign talent once they have completed their studies.

•.  The Service for Diversity and Social Inclusion of Montréal supports cultural and social integration activities for immigrants and people from diverse backgrounds.

Areas with potential for further development: 

•.  The city of Montréal does not systematically assess its labour market needs to attract newcomers that could help fill gaps.

Key findings
Mobility dimensions of crises

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

•.  Montréal’s civil security plan includes measures to manage large-scale population movements in times of crisis such as the temporary housing of displaced inhabitants.

•   The city’s civil security policy includes a component on communication with inhabitants during crises.

Areas with potential for further development: 

•   The city’s main emergency response policy does not take explicit account of the specific needs of migrants and displaced persons. 

•   There are no coordination agreements with key counterparts (such as consulates) for assistance to non-nationals in the event of a local emergency.

Key findings
Safe, orderly and regular migration

Migration Governance: examples of well-developed areas:

•   Montréal’ police force trains its police officers on management of diversity and intercultural relations. 

•   The city provides support to a legal aid clinic and a health clinic whose services are exclusively for all migrants, regardless of their status.

•.  Montréal works on sexual exploitation and human trafficking prevention through activities such as thematic working meetings on women and girls’ safety.

Areas with potential for further development: 

•   The Montréal Police Department’s master action plan on prostitution and human trafficking for the purposes of sexual exploitation has not been updated since 2016. 

2019 June

Migration Governance Profile: City of Montréal