About the Migration Governance Indicators
About the Migration Governance Indicators
Migrants' rights
Migrants' rights

Indicators in this domain assess the extent to which migrants have the same status as citizens in terms of access to basic social services such as health, education, and social security. It also describes the rights of migrants to family reunification, to work, and to residency and citizenship. The ratification of the main international conventions is also included within this domain.

Whole of government approach
Whole of government approach

Indicators in this domain assess countries’ institutional, legal, and regulatory frameworks related to migration policies. Domain 2 also reviews the existence of national migration strategies that are in-line with development, as well as institutional transparency and coherence in relation to migration management. This domain also investigates the extent to which governments collect and use migration data.

Partnerships
Partnerships

This domain focuses on countries’ efforts to cooperate on migration-related issues with other states and with relevant non-governmental actors, including civil society organizations and the private sector. Cooperation can lead to improvements in governance by aligning and raising standards, increasing dialogue and providing structures to overcome challenges.

Well-being of migrants
Well-being of migrants

This domain includes indicators on countries’ policies for managing the socioeconomic well-being of migrants, through aspects such as the recognition of migrants’ educational and professional qualifications, provisions regulating student migration and the existence of bilateral labour agreements between countries. Indicators equally focus on policies and strategies related to diaspora engagement and migrant remittances.

Mobility dimensions of crises
Mobility dimensions of crises

This domain studies the type and level of preparedness of countries when they are faced with mobility dimensions of crises, linked to either disasters, the environment and/or conflict. The questions are used to identify the processes in place for nationals and non-nationals both during and after disasters, including whether humanitarian assistance is equally available to migrants as it is to citizens.

Safe, orderly and dignified migration
Safe, orderly and dignified migration

This domain analyses countries’ approach to migration management in terms of border control and enforcement policies, admission criteria for migrants, preparedness and resilience in the case of significant and unexpected migration flows, as well as the fight against trafficking in human beings and smuggling of migrants. It also assesses efforts and incentives to help integrate returning citizens.

Key findings
INTRODUCTION

This country snapshot describes examples of well-developed areas of the Dominican Republic’s migration governance structures and areas with potential for further development, as evaluated by the six domains of the Migration Governance Indicators (MGI). These address migrants’ rights, a “whole-of-government” approach, partnerships, socioeconomic well-being of migrants, the mobility dimensions of crises, and safe and orderly migration.

Click the icons on the wheel to explore the key findings.

The Migration Governance Indicators (MGI) initiative is a policy-benchmarking programme led by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and implemented with the support of the Economist Intelligence Unit. Funding is provided by the Government of Sweden.

Key findings
MIGRANTS’ RIGHTS

Migration Governance: Examples of well-developed areas: 

  • All immigrants can access public health services and social security, regardless of their legal status.  

  • All immigrants in the country enjoy access to education.  

  • Temporary residents may apply for permanent residency after five years of continuous residence in the Dominican Republic. 

Areas with potential for further development:  

  • There are some restrictions on work for immigrants. For example, migrants are not allowed to work in the public sector as civil servants.  

  • Immigrants are not entitled to vote in municipal elections. 

Key findings
WHOLE-OF-GOVERNMENT APPROACH

Migration Governance: Examples of well-developed areas: 

  • The Dominican Republic has exhaustive regulations on migration.  

  • Information on migration procedures are regulations is easily accessible. For instance, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs published information on its website regarding migration rules and regulations.  

  • Migration issues are adequately reflected in development policies.  

Areas with potential for further development:  

  • Although a national migration strategy has been defined in a programmatic document, it is not exhaustive.

Key findings
PARTNERSHIPS

Migration Governance: Examples of well-developed areas: 

  • The Dominican Republic participates in several regional consultation processes on migration that address policy cooperation.  

  • There are mechanisms to ensure the participation of civil society organizations and the private sector in the preparation and implementation of initiatives on migration.  

  • The Dominican Republic has concluded bilateral agreements on migration with other countries with a view to regularizing migration processes. It has also signed memorandums of understanding on cooperation in migration and consular matters. For instance, Haiti and the Dominican Republic have a binational technical cooperation mechanism to address migrant health matters.

Key findings
WELL-BEING OF MIGRANTS

Migration Governance: Examples of well-developed areas:  

  • The Dominican Republic takes into account the abilities and skills of applicants for temporary residence or work permits. The visa is issued after verification that the qualifications of candidates match the profile and needs of the requesting company. 

  • International students have unrestricted access to university-level education. 

Areas with potential for further development:  

  • The Dominican Republic lacks nationwide procedures for monitoring the labour market and the demand for immigrants (for example, lists of sectors with labour shortages). 

  • Although family remittances represent the third largest source of foreign exchange in the Dominican Republic, there are no schemes to encourage or formalize those flows.

Key findings
MOBILITY DIMENSION OF CRISES

Migration Governance: Examples of well-developed areas: 

  • The National Climate Change Adaptation Plan (PANA) was adopted in 2008 and addresses migration flows stemming from environmental degradation and the adverse impacts of climate change.  Similarly, the Strategic Plan for Climate Change (2011-2030) mentions migration in the section on infrastructure and population dynamics and calls for incentives for the formulation of programmes to address migration and refugee movements triggered by climatic factors. 

  • There are government measures in place to assist nationals abroad through consular services. 

Areas with potential for further development:  

  • Recovery plans do not provide for the return of displaced populations following a disaster.

Key findings
SAFE, ORDERLY AND DIGNIFIED MIGRATION

Migration Governance: Examples of well-developed areas: 

  • The Dominican Republic has an entity that bears overall responsibility for border control and security.  

  • The Ministry of Foreign Affairs has a website which clearly describes the requirements for residence visas and permits. The system for completing the formalities to obtain an entry visa to the Dominican Republic allows for several options: it can be done entirely via the electronic portal, in a hybrid manner, or by submitting the hard copy of documents. 

  • The Attorney-General of the Republic is working closely with groups of migrants who are victims of organized international criminal networks engaging in human trafficking and smuggling, for the most part women, children and adolescents in vulnerable situations. Among the services envisaged under the project are support for job market integration and job mediation, education and health services, social assistance and legal and consular assistance. 

Areas with potential for further development:  

  • The bodies that set migration and development policy, such as the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of the Economy, have launched policy planning processes designed to encourage the return of nationals residing abroad. 

2018 May

Migration Governance Snapshot: Dominican Republic